The Literary Young Adult Novel by Craig Terlson is Now Available!

Where were you in the summer of 1973?

Blue Moon Publishers is excited to release Winnipeg author Craig Terlson’s new literary young adult novel, Fall In One Daywhich combines the true history of government LSD testing in the 1950s with a riveting coming-of-age tale that takes place two decades later.

About Fall In One Day 

Fall in One Day tells the story of fifteen-year-old Joe Beck, who enlists his older brother and their DJ stoner friend to plan a rescue when his best friend Brian goes missing. In 1973, a time of subversive drug culture, changing social roles, and Watergate, Joe sees that adults don’t always tell the truth, and knows that if Brian is going to be found, it’s up to him. With the unflinching honesty of a teenager’s-eye view, Joe learns how trust is betrayed, and the truth, even if it hurts, has to be uncovered.

Inspiration for Fall In One Day 

“Growing up, I saw these politicians on TV lying to stay out of jail, and I remember wondering who else, out there, wasn’t telling the truth,” says Terlson. “At the same time, many movies from the 1970s dealt with some sort of conspiracy, and I was fascinated by the hidden stories.”

When asked what books Fall in One Day might be compared to, Terlson says that he thought of Richard Ford’s Wildlife, or Canada, his recent book, which featured a teenage protagonist. As well, stories by Guy Vanderhaeghe, notably Things as They Are? and Daddy Lenin, or I Am the Messenger by Markus Zusak, draw comparisons. The Netflix series Stranger Things also evokes the plot of a missing boy and his young friends searching for answers.

About Craig Terlson

Craig Terlson grew up in Saskatchewan, and then, like a good Canadian, proceeded to live in three other provinces and visit the rest, finally settling in Winnipeg. After graduating from the Alberta College of Art and Design, he began a 26 year career of illustration, and then began to pursue a comic syndication contract. After consideration from King Features, and then placing in the finals of a Washington Post Writer’s Group contest, he realized that he loved writing the words to the comics even more than drawing the pictures.

Craig’s fiction brings together a quirky, dark sense of humour and ear for the dialogue that he heard growing up on the Canadian prairies. His writing possesses a cinematic quality, and an eye for detail that stems from his years of painting and drawing. Craig’s background working on a psychiatric ward, sipping plonk at magazine parties, graphic designing and instructing at a University, and even working as a part-time pastor, produced a lot of stories. Now, he tells them without having to draw the pictures.

Share with Us

Where were you in the summer of 1973?